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THE UNDENIABLE TRUTH ABOUT ELVIS, RACISM
AND AMERICAN MUSIC HISTORY
February 10, 2016  The Examiner / Elvis Express Radio
Elvis Express Radio News
The truth about Elvis Presley and the subject of racism requires knowledge about his early childhood and an exploration of the facts of his life throughout his career.

The great American musical pioneers of the 1950s were precise in their adamant characterizations of Presley being a uniting force. They often described him as the person who
did far more for bringing blacks and whites together than anyone culturally. According to three of the finest researchers around the world, they all agree that Presley was a catalyst
and powerful (as an individual human being and a worldwide example) influencer from the beginning...and continues to be.

Today, the Examiner reached out to these three experts on the topic to set the record straight and end the false narratives. Their cumulative research represents over 80 years of
study, exploration and documentation in the field of culture, music history and Elvis Presley. These specialists are:
Left to Right: Elvis with Mahalia Jackson (singer), Stephanie Spruill (singer), Billy Ward (singer), BB King (singer), Cissy Houston (singer) and Jackie Wilson (singer)
> Guillermo F. Perez-Argüello is a former Nicaraguan diplomat and United Nations staff member. Perez-Arguello is a graduate of Oxford University and considered by many to be
one of the most prolific Elvis Presley historians in the world. Although he has resided in 18 different countries, Perez-Arguello now lives in Nicaragua.

>
Craig Philo is a music researcher and historian from Sheppey, in Kent, United Kingdom.

>
Jay Viviano is a pop culture historian with over 20 years of experience in research of icons of the 50’s and 60’s, with a strong concentration on Blues artists.

Guillermo F. Perez-Argüello (GPA): Critics and the uninformed should put themselves “in the position the 7-year-old Elvis Presley found himself in, circa 1942. He was white, but
living in an area of Tupelo, Mississippi, totally surrounded by African Americans. With an unerring ear and a photographic memory, he totally absorbed everything he heard, LIVE,
at the gospel churches attended by African Americans. Now, this was not Georgia, Florida, New York, or Illinois, let alone California, Washington State, but Mississippi, a state which
was then the poorest of the then 49 states of the Union.

Craig Philo (CP): “Sam Bell, a childhood black friend in Tupelo, feared for his friend when Elvis made his life changing journey to Memphis at the age of 13 with his beloved
parents. You see, perhaps old Sam knew a thing or two about human behavior, knew how his friend’s open and honest approach to all he came in contact with, driven into him by
his mother not to hurt another's feelings would someday hurt him, how right he was!”

GPA: “Then, at age 13, with his parents, he moves to the second poorest, Tennessee, actually to Memphis, the crossroads of urban and city blues. Forget about the ear and the
memory as, by now, starting at age 16, we are talking about a human being who MUSICALLY loves and masters everything around him--namely R&B, the Blues, and Gospel of all
denominations, plus European ballads, Country and Western, Opera, Neo-classical recordings, Pop, you name it, he masters it. And to top it all, he is armed as well with the most
eclectic and elastic voice in history. In 1954, it became the most important, which it remains to this day. And that is why BB King was so impressed when he first met him, a lad of 17.
‘He knew more blues and gospel songs than anyone I had ever met’ and years later added, ‘I understand why they call him the King.’ Nuff said, from the King of the Blues.”

Jay Viviano (JV): “Reverend Milton Perry was an early Civil Rights activist in the 1950s. He had Elvis' back just like many other great legends did. He published an open letter to
Black America in a 1957 magazine that stated, after spending time talking to not only white people, but Black people in the R&B and Blues community, as well as African Americans
that knew him as a child in Tupelo. ‘I found that an overwhelming majority of people who know Elvis speak of this boy as a boy who practices humility and a love for racial harmony,”
Rev. Perry wrote. “I learned that he is not too proud or important to speak to anyone, and to spend time with his fans of whatever color, whenever or wherever they approached
him.’”

GPA: “Elvis stealing from black music? Tell it to BB King, Otis Redding, James Brown, Jackie Wilson, Cissy Houston, Darlene Love, Jim Brown, Mohammed Ali, Jesse Jackson, Al
Green, Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Sammy Davis Jr. Count Basie, even Public Enemy's Chuck D, who reconsidered his 1989 views in Fight the Power, and he did so in 2002, as
well as to hundreds of other notable African Americans I have on record saying that was NOT the case with Presley.”

JV: “BB King, bluesman Little Milton and Little Richard referred to Elvis as an ‘Integrator.’ And they both use the words ‘that guts it took for Elvis to do what he was doing’ in their
own interviews. Elvis ticked off mainstream racist white America when he came on the scene--especially the KKK and white Citizens Council members---by hanging out with black
folks in public, speaking respectful of black artists and continually defending rock and roll, R&B and blues music to the point that young white American kids were paying attention
and opening up their minds.

This drove their parents (meaning mainstream racist white America) to anger against Elvis. For his first two years on the scene he was public enemy number one. Little Richard in a
later interview in his life praised Elvis passionately for his impact on young white America.”

CP: “In all my time on researching Elvis Aaron Presley I have never ever once come across any racial behavior or activity. Indeed the only stuff you will find was a slanderous lie
that's gathered mythical proportions through the years originally reported by Sepia magazine in April of 1957 and consequently torn to shreds by none other than the great Louie
Robinson of Jet Magazine.”

GPA: “In fact Louis Robinson, the talented African American writer who Jet Magazine commissioned to go to LA and interview Presley on the MGM set of "Jailhouse Rock", in 1957,
to obtain his views on racist and other "copycat" remarks which appeared in SEPIA, a magazine geared towards the African American market in the US South. But unlike Jet and
Ebony, it was owned by white anti-integrationist and based in Fort Worth, TX.

Robinson has just passed away. He unequivocally stated the rumors were false, so this mentioning of Presley as one who stole, or copied, from African Americans and coming from
a prestigious magazine as Ebony tells me (that any writer who differs), well how can I put this, is ill informed.”

JV: “The truth though, which stands up to scrutiny, is that there simply was no other white man as famous as Elvis back in those days that took so many hits for proudly befriending
the black community.
The ridiculous fact that people try to spread the opposite as ‘some sort of truth’ makes it paramount that this is handled aggressively.”

CP: “When actor Sidney Poitier and tennis great Arthur Ashe wanted to write books, they sought Mr. Robinson’s help. ‘Never in my life have I known a better man,’ Poitier said. Yes,
Robinson went and interviewed Elvis on the set of Jailhouse Rock. The fact Presley was never in Boston when the quote was reputedly made matters little to some. It was and
remains a vicious lie concocted by a fearful white middle America as a weapon to try and cut down this brave and carefree spirited individual whose only crime was to record the
music he loved and respected. And at all times in doing so paid reverence and respect to those black artists that he deemed did it better than he did. After all, there is no color in
music!”

JV: “People need to get over their ignorance about American history. Elvis did himself NO favors back then by hanging out and letting himself be photographed with black folks.
Racism was a common blatant practice of the day. It was these very things that made Elvis hated by many older white folks, yet respected by the black community.

Reverend Milton Perry concluded his statement by saying ‘Presley set an example of wholesome Brotherhood. I find something to admire in Presley and that is his attitude on the
racial issue. And that it would be good if other people in the South in other parts of the nation emulated his attitude’."

GPA: “Notice that, in the US, of all the early Blues, Country and Western, Gospel and R&B masters, the ones who sprang from them, namely Elvis Presley, Fats Domino, Chuck
Berry, Bo Diddley, Bill Haley, Little Richard and Ray Charles, let alone the ones who sprang from or appeared in the scene IMMEDIATELEY after them; namely Johnny Cash, Roy
Orbison, Ricky Nelson, Buddy Holly, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Gene Vincent and say Eddie Cochran, the only one whose MUSICAL palette was totally complete was Elvis
Presley.

Otherwise, how can one explain that the top singer in the world, on December 4, 1956, should start, the guitar now firmly in his arms, the so called Million Dollar Quartet session
with an Agustin Lara song from 1941, the classic "Solamente una vez." Only Elvis, in this case with (his mother) Gladys' music taste's help, was destined to rule.”

JV: “Interestingly, not only did Elvis have same blues background many blues man, but also their same Country and Western roots. As so many blues artists did indeed, in many of
their interviews, state they had strong Country and Western music influences as well.

Otis Blackwell had strong country in Western roots. Some in the blues and R&B community accused him of being too country. That explains why he and Elvis were probably such a
perfect fit right out of the gate for Elvis to end up doing a handful of his songs. I always thought these dynamics were interesting and things aren't always cut and dry as people
assume.”

CP: “Is it so farfetched or is it just simple logic that of the time in mid-50's segregated America that it took a white kid to bust open the doors for all these truly great black artists? Is
it right that Presley gets lambasted and ridiculed by so many because he was that one? People seem to forget the song that catapulted him to stardom in the south had on the
backside of it 'Blue moon of Kentucky' steeped in Bluegrass/Country, until Presley spiced it up as he did with ‘That's Alright,’ which is in no way a theft of any kind! Crudup is in
there but so too are other influences. Presley was not a COPYCAT! A COOL CAT YES!”

JV: “I mean is there anybody that SERIOUSLY would say, if they could go back in time, they would tell Muhammad Ali, James Brown, BB King, Bobby blue Bland, Etta James,
Sammy Davis Jr, Jackie Wilson and many others, they were wrong for proudly calling Elvis their friend and stating he was a help to black artists.

Many of them said it wasn't until Elvis got other white kids across America listening to rock and roll that it was after that, their own records started to skyrocket in sales. And if we go
back and look at the physical numbers and sales charts we see this is true.

Even modern activists that have been around since the 1960's civil rights movement have admitted they were wrong about Elvis. Nikki Giovanni there for the movement since the
1960s is a perfect example: ‘I'm glad to find out I was wrong about Elvis.’

Dret Scott Keyes when becoming aware of the integrity Elvis had, always pointing out the black music influence on him, just as he did the country and western and white pop artists,
‘Elvis was honest.’
And they're certainly not the only ones.

The R&B community acknowledge him and inducted him into the R&B Hall of Fame last year along with Little Richard, Bobby Rush and other legends that had publicly praised
Elvis.”

CP: “When a reporter referred to Elvis as the ‘King of Rock ’n’ Roll’ at the press conference following his 1969 Las Vegas opening, he rejected the title, as he always did, calling
attention to the presence in the room of his friend Fats Domino, ‘one of my influences from way back.’ He often paid homage to Fats recognizing no one could sing those songs like
he did.

From close friends to the many, many black entertainers that he adored or merely those that met him briefly, have come out and said PROUDLY he was my friend. To quote
Muhammad Ali, ‘Elvis Presley was the sweetest, most humble and nicest man you'd want to know.’ Sammy Davis Junior another also was quoted as saying "the only thing that's
matters, is that he was my friend."

GPA: Rev. Thomas A. Dorsey was highlighted on a recent Black History Month television program and I the “mention of Mahalia Jackson and Elvis Presley having recorded the
Reverend's ‘Take my Hand Precious Lord.’ There was another song also penned by the Reverend which was, in fact, written for Mahalia in 1937 and which Presley sang live, on
January 6, 1957, during his third appearance at the Ed Sullivan Show, at CBS.

The audience, estimated by Trendex, the precursor of Nielsen, at 50 million. As this may be the largest audience ever assembled on US television for a gospel song, ever, and that
includes Obama's swearing in which drew less than 50 million. It may be important to take note of what became of it.

Presley wanted to sing it, as he had promised his mother that he would do, but Ed Sullivan was initially against it. During rehearsals that same day, the decision to film Presley from
the waist up only was taken by Sullivan, for other reasons, so eventually Sullivan eased on Presley's request. Elvis was allowed to sing it that night, immediately following Sullivan's
announcement that Presley wanted specifically for those watching to send their contributions towards the lessening of the plight of some 250,000 Hungarians fleeing the Soviet
intervention of their country and which had taken place on both the 24th and 31st of October of 1956. Sullivan added that Presley wanted to dedicate the song to the Hungarians.

By the end of 1957, in the next 11 months, some $6 million were received as a result of Presley's request. In 2010, the Mayor of Budapest honored Presley posthumously by
making him a citizen of that city and naming a park facing the oldest and most beautiful bridge, the Margret Bridge, after him.

The song's delivery by Presley was so earnest, that it brightened the hearts of the 50 million watching, and they in turn, as I said, sent the equivalent of $49.5 million in 2016 dollars
(SFR 26 million at the 1957 SFR 4.31 to the US$ exchange rate). So, the Reverend's song brought a happy ending, via Elvis, as the refugees settled for life in both Vienna and
London.”

JV: “Just one example is Elvis being the ONLY white artist that bothered to show up at charity events for black folks. Google ‘Elvis Goodwill Review Memphis.’ Carl Perkins, Buddy
Holly, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, Bill Haley and many other white artists, were NOT doing these things. And many of the black artist from those days have pointed this out, while
making it very clear, Elvis WAS.

People need to get over the NEED to inaccurate, continue to portray Presley as just some ‘cold-hearted cultural bandit.’ We need quit believing the lies and rumors that keep
getting passed on over the decades as "truth" and to start respecting the words of our legends who said otherwise. To even try to disagree with these things or argue against it
only makes those that do look bad, and it's a disrespect to our great black legends that have praised and defended Elvis.

There were white guys back then that were cheap imitations, just jumping on the bandwagon, like Pat Boone, and others that are guilty of appropriation, but James Brown, BB King,
and many others said Elvis was NOT the one. They pointed out Elvis came from extreme poverty and humble conditions and new and respected the music he was singing.

The R&B community has done the research themselves in recent years and found out Elvis was incorrectly labeled ‘a racist and cultural thief.’ They have done their part trying to
publicly honor Elvis in many ways the last few years and help clear Elvis name of slanderous claims of him being a ‘racist thief.’ Many have paid attention to many of our great black
legends from the past who have defended Elvis in their interviews and in their own autobiographies, basically stating how much credit EP always publicly gave to black artists in his
interviews and how much help he was to the black community ....especially when we consider the KKK is documented to have hated Elvis.”

CP: “For far too long accusations of cultural thief, racist and white trash have been disgracefully hung around Presley's neck like a blinding Vegas neon sign. The time has come
once and for all for this crap to be debunked--blown to smithereens. You can label it anyway you like, but purely and simply, isn't it time the real truth was told?

Now telling the truth, researching the truth is far different from listening to rumor. If you think by cupping your ear to listen with intent to nasty whispers and needless tittle tattle in
trying to dirty a man’s name is without shame, then continue. The real shame here is that actually that man stood for so much that was right with the world. Still, if that is OK and of
noteworthy behavior to you then stand up and be counted and look like the fool you are. Do some reading! In all seriousness it borders on stupidity and ignorance of biblical
proportions.